why is scala so popular?

It is considered the alternative to Java, and in terms of learning a new language, Scala is extremely practical and serves many use cases, which is why it has emerged in the job market. To help you get started with Scala, we have developed our free Learn Scala from scratch course. This blog post will discuss why I think this has happened, where Scala is now, and what the future holds for the Scala community. A large part of the Scala community only uses Scala because it needs to interoperate with Spark in some way.

Some of the more complex features of the language (tuples, functions, macros, to name a few) ultimately make it easier for the developer to write better code and increase performance by programming in Scala. As a result, programming in Scala is a bit more difficult, but the result is a much cleaner and well-organised language that is ultimately easier to use and increases productivity. Scala is a type-safe JVM language that incorporates both object-oriented and functional programming in an extremely concise, logical and extraordinarily powerful language. And in today's article, I'd like to show you some facts about the popularity of the Scala language, the benefits of using it and list some useful Scala blogs, where you can regularly find useful information with theory and practical examples.

A recent tweet from a friend of mine pointed out how public interest in the Scala programming language seems to have stagnated or declined, which coincides with my sense of the latest trends and zeitgeist. But Scala developers also recognised the incredible value proposition of functional programming (the ability to develop code without regard to state). Scala was developed at the University of Switzerland with the intention of creating new innovations in programming language research for mainstream languages like Java. While there will always be use cases where high-concurrency reactive architectures or purely functional programming are the best tool for the job, I hope that in the future developers will be able to easily and simply get into the Scala language, and only have to learn those more advanced techniques when they need to.

For those of you who are hearing about Scala for the first time - or who have heard of it only in passing - let's start with a brief look at the history of Scala. Scala enough to give you a preliminary idea of Scala's power and capabilities and whet your appetite for learning the language. The Scala IDE provides advanced editing and debugging support for the development of pure Scala and mixed Scala-Java applications. As a result, there are certainly code distinctions and paradigm shifts that can make early learning of Scala programming a bit more difficult, but the result is a much cleaner and well-organised language that is ultimately easier to use and increases productivity.