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Development Environment for Small Laptop

Peter Wolf
Hello, 

I am teaching Scala to a remote developer who likes command line tools and text editors.  He likes the text editor MD and debugs with print statements.  His Linux laptop only has 4G of memory.  I think he will have a miserable time trying to work with Scala code.

The rest of my team uses IntelliJ on machines with 8G or 16G or memory.  This will not work for him

Can anyone recommend good Scala tools for small machines?

Thanks
P

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Re: Development Environment for Small Laptop

Rex Kerr-2
I have a wonderful time with Scala code without big bloated IDEs, and find print statements perfectly adequate for most debugging tasks.

I'm not familiar with MD, but any decent text editor should do.  I'm partial to Sublime Text, but I've even used Kate in the past and not had serious complaints.  I'm not sure whether ENSIME with emacs or something is lightweight enough--I don't use it.

The one thing that the remote developer should do that maybe the rest of you don't so much is make heavy use of the REPL.  It's way faster to work out problems and explore them there than try to wade through an IDE with debugger.  Embedding Ammonite can be very powerful as an upgrade from println: http://www.lihaoyi.com/Ammonite/#Embedding

  --Rex


On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 9:16 AM, Peter Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello, 

I am teaching Scala to a remote developer who likes command line tools and text editors.  He likes the text editor MD and debugs with print statements.  His Linux laptop only has 4G of memory.  I think he will have a miserable time trying to work with Scala code.

The rest of my team uses IntelliJ on machines with 8G or 16G or memory.  This will not work for him

Can anyone recommend good Scala tools for small machines?

Thanks
P

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Re: Development Environment for Small Laptop

Vincent Marquez
I use Vim with the Conque plugin, running  Ammonite REPL exclusively for both my full time job as well as when I am working on Scalaz.  My work machine is quite powerful, but I use the same setup in my older model Macbook Air (4 gb of ram) and it works just fine. 

--Vincent

On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 9:34 AM, Rex Kerr <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a wonderful time with Scala code without big bloated IDEs, and find print statements perfectly adequate for most debugging tasks.

I'm not familiar with MD, but any decent text editor should do.  I'm partial to Sublime Text, but I've even used Kate in the past and not had serious complaints.  I'm not sure whether ENSIME with emacs or something is lightweight enough--I don't use it.

The one thing that the remote developer should do that maybe the rest of you don't so much is make heavy use of the REPL.  It's way faster to work out problems and explore them there than try to wade through an IDE with debugger.  Embedding Ammonite can be very powerful as an upgrade from println: http://www.lihaoyi.com/Ammonite/#Embedding

  --Rex


On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 9:16 AM, Peter Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello, 

I am teaching Scala to a remote developer who likes command line tools and text editors.  He likes the text editor MD and debugs with print statements.  His Linux laptop only has 4G of memory.  I think he will have a miserable time trying to work with Scala code.

The rest of my team uses IntelliJ on machines with 8G or 16G or memory.  This will not work for him

Can anyone recommend good Scala tools for small machines?

Thanks
P

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Re: Development Environment for Small Laptop

El-Hassan Wanas
In reply to this post by Rex Kerr-2
I second Rex on that. Actually there's nothing wrong with using a decent text editor and Ensime(http://ensime.org/). I've used ensime across editors(atom, vim) and build tools(sbt, gradle) and it was more performant and lightweight than using intellij.

Also in order to get good hints like intellij does for users, there are lots of extensions that can be integrated into gradle or sbt, some examples:
https://github.com/HairyFotr/linter linter plugin
https://github.com/wartremover/wartremover another linter plugin
https://github.com/scalastyle/scalastyle for style checking, output is textual
http://scoverage.org/ For coverage report generation without IDE

Wanas

On 01/13/2017 08:34 PM, Rex Kerr wrote:
I have a wonderful time with Scala code without big bloated IDEs, and find print statements perfectly adequate for most debugging tasks.

I'm not familiar with MD, but any decent text editor should do.  I'm partial to Sublime Text, but I've even used Kate in the past and not had serious complaints.  I'm not sure whether ENSIME with emacs or something is lightweight enough--I don't use it.

The one thing that the remote developer should do that maybe the rest of you don't so much is make heavy use of the REPL.  It's way faster to work out problems and explore them there than try to wade through an IDE with debugger.  Embedding Ammonite can be very powerful as an upgrade from println: http://www.lihaoyi.com/Ammonite/#Embedding

  --Rex


On Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 9:16 AM, Peter Wolf <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello, 

I am teaching Scala to a remote developer who likes command line tools and text editors.  He likes the text editor MD and debugs with print statements.  His Linux laptop only has 4G of memory.  I think he will have a miserable time trying to work with Scala code.

The rest of my team uses IntelliJ on machines with 8G or 16G or memory.  This will not work for him

Can anyone recommend good Scala tools for small machines?

Thanks
P
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Re: Development Environment for Small Laptop

Andrew Gaydenko
I would not define ENSIME as lightweight as far as it runs own server eager for RAM. So, ENSIME + dedicated SBT session for each open project can be heavy to suit into 4 GB.

(In other ways, yes, ENSIME is the way, I do use it during two years or so)

On Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 2:51:51 PM UTC+3, El-Hassan Wanas wrote:
I second Rex on that. Actually there's nothing wrong with using a decent text editor and Ensime(<a href="http://ensime.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow" onmousedown="this.href=&#39;http://www.google.com/url?q\x3dhttp%3A%2F%2Fensime.org%2F\x26sa\x3dD\x26sntz\x3d1\x26usg\x3dAFQjCNHgTYNjf7GR_qejFMlM3-Pu3awRkg&#39;;return true;" onclick="this.href=&#39;http://www.google.com/url?q\x3dhttp%3A%2F%2Fensime.org%2F\x26sa\x3dD\x26sntz\x3d1\x26usg\x3dAFQjCNHgTYNjf7GR_qejFMlM3-Pu3awRkg&#39;;return true;">http://ensime.org/). I've used ensime across editors(atom, vim) and build tools(sbt, gradle) and it was more performant and lightweight than using intellij.

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Re: Development Environment for Small Laptop

Stephen Compall-3
On 1/17/17 8:28 AM, Andrew Gaydenko wrote:

> I would not define ENSIME as lightweight as far as it runs own server
> eager for RAM. So, ENSIME + dedicated SBT session for each open
> project can be heavy to suit into 4 GB.
>
> (In other ways, yes, ENSIME is the way, I do use it during two years
> or so)

If the developer in question likes text editors as they are, I don't
think they'll necessarily be interested in "smart" editor features. I
sympathize; often, this stuff makes it too hard for me to think, and I
have to turn it off anyway, so I do without most of the time.

For the OP: I've done this kind of thing on 2 GB machines just fine,
with editor + a running sbt repl, usually in ~compile to give me
feedback when I save. 2 GB is plenty for that, especially on GNU/Linux,
unless the project is very, very large and needs a big -Xmx to JVM in
order to compile.  (Individual subproject size is the relevant factor,
here; splitting a big project into subprojects cuts the max scalac
memory down nicely.)  With 4 GB, such concerns are moot; the main use of
more is to be able to comfortably run multiple sbt jobs at the same time.

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Stephen Compall

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